SLO County Cannabis Business Association > Blog > Articles by: Marie Roth

Anticipating California Cannabis Licensing Applications from Bureau

Well, here we are, one month away from the GO date for legal and regulated cannabis sales in California!

Normally, I'd be excited about such a thing, but unfortunately am feeling the stress and anxiety of SLOcal cannabis business owners scrambling to find new property to cultivate on, buildings to lease, requirements to meet, services to contract, application fees as well as License Permit fees to pay all within this next 30 days.  It's like watching the largest game of musical chairs I've ever seen, with multiple chairs being pulled each time the music stops.

Before we get into the State issues, let's visit the local regulation first.  The SLO Board of Supervisors on November 27th voted to adopt the new regulation concerning commercial cannabis production & retail as well as banned all outdoor cultivation for personal use.   I don't have much that is positive to say about this at the moment except for it was not at all what I expected when we started this journey over a year and 1/2 ago.  SLOCCBA board members will be convening today to discuss our position as well as any options that may be available as a response to unpopular restrictions.   More to come.

The state as of this moment hasn't opened up the portal to accept applications yet.  You can sign up to receive email updates from the state as well as monitor the FB page or Twitter account by following @Bccinfo.dca to be one of the first to know!  In the meantime, requirements are posted.  If you're anticipating having a cannabis business, I sure hope you've already viewed, know and began assembling your application package!

Here's a great article in The Desert Sun summarizing what you can expect come January 1st as the long awaited legalization rolls out.  Availability will be scarce. No where in SLO County, will you be able to legally purchase cannabis products....that I know of at this moment.

I'm still disappointed that our local leadership thought time was better spent in restricting access to legal cannabis rather than investing time to help these businesses become legitimate, legal and ready to apply with the State agencies.  It remains to be seen how local law enforcement & leadership are going to treat providers and consumers as they struggle to find the products they're used to purchasing come the new year.

If you are a business owner in need of resources or have services to offer, please feel free to email Marie@SLOCCBA.org for referrals or give me a call at (805) 712-5963.

Peace,

Marie Roth

SLOCCBA President

 

 

California Allows Cannabis Monopolies

In the past almost two years that I've been working in the California cannabis space, I've been inspired by the American dream of owning one's own business.  The opportunity that's come about for Californians to transition to a legitimate, above board cannabis business has been met with unprecedented enthusiasm by thousands of currently operating small canna-biz owners.

This is precisely why I got into this gig, I could see the potential for these businesses to provide locally grown, quality products to those in need in their community and even enjoy a little California Cannabis market competition much like our California wine industry does.  I instantly wanted to be a part of this historic transition to help guide these business owners by gathering & sharing the resources I've acquired to help businesses become competitive & successful in the modern marketplace.

While these small businesses have been busy positioning their seat at the table so have inventors,  investors and large corporations.  Unfortunately, the State of California Regulators made a decision yesterday in the release of  final state commercial cannabis production regulations to not limit cultivation to 1 acre.  This is a devastating decision and does little in protecting the original California cannabis growers way of farming.  Say hello to big corporate and mechanized cannabis farming in California.  Say good by to your small scale local cannabis provider as the vicious competition begins to provide cheap mass produced California cannabis products to the undiscriminating consumer.  Ultimately lowering the price of cannabis making it financially impossible for the small farmer to afford to participate.

Can we demand a fair market place for the original cannabis producer?   Can we salvage the legacy of California sungrown cannabis cultivated by the loving hands of experienced and compassionate farmers?

Yes we can!  Start by completing this survey TODAY from California Growers Association. asking for a cap of 1 acre cultivation. http://www.calgrowersassociation.org/1_acre. 

And then be sure to contact your local state representative to let them know how you feel about large corporate monopolies taking over California cannabis production.

Corporate cannabis cultivation is contradictory to California Cannabis Cultivation! 

Contact - Assemblymen Jordan Cunningham

Contact - Senator Bill Monning

Until next time~

Peace

Marie

 

 

New Cannabis Taxes Begin January 1, 2018

As we near the GO date of January 2nd, 2018 there are many facets of doing canna-biz that will all have to pull together in somekind of organized fashion.  One of those aspects is taxation.  Instead of writing a summary of the e-mail I received this morning from The Bureau, I'll share it with you in it's entirety.

 

October 3, 2017-

If you sell cannabis or cannabis products, you must register with the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) for a seller’s permit. Cannabis cultivators, processors, manufacturers, retailers, microbusinesses, and distributors making sales are required to obtain and maintain a seller’s permit as a prerequisite for applying for a license with the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the California Department of Consumer Affairs, or the California Department of Public Health.

Distributors of cannabis and cannabis products must also register with the CDTFA for a cannabis tax permit to report and pay the two new cannabis taxes to the CDTFA. The cannabis tax permit is in addition to your seller’s permit.

Beginning January 1, 2018, two new cannabis taxes are in effect:
• A 15 percent excise tax is imposed upon purchasers of cannabis and cannabis products. Retailers are required to collect the excise tax from the purchaser and pay it to the cannabis distributor.
• A tax on the cultivation of cannabis that enters the commercial market is imposed upon cultivators. Cultivators are required to pay the cultivation tax to either a distributor or a manufacturer depending upon the nature of the transaction. The cultivation tax rates are:

o $9.25 per dry-weight ounce of cannabis flowers, and

o $2.75 per dry-weight ounce of cannabis leaves.

All cannabis businesses making sales are required to:
• Register online with the CDTFA for a seller’s permit.
• File sales and use tax returns electronically and pay any sales and use tax to the CDTFA. Even if none of your sales are subject to sales tax, you are still required to file a return and report your activities on your return to the CDTFA.

In addition, if you are a cannabis distributor, the following requirements apply to you:
• Prior to January 1, 2018, register online with the CDTFA for a cannabis tax permit. (Registration will be available in November 2017.)
• Beginning January 1, 2018, collect the excise tax from retailers you supply.
• Beginning January 1, 2018, collect the cultivation tax from cultivators or manufacturers that send or transfer cannabis and cannabis products to you.
• File both your cannabis tax and sales and use tax returns electronically and pay any tax amounts due to the CDTFA.

For additional information about the Bureau of Cannabis Control, or to subscribe to email alerts to hear about updates as they become available, please visit our website - http://www.bcc.ca.gov/. For information on all three licensing authorities, please visit the state’s cannabis web portal – cannabis.ca.gov. Follow the Bureau on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for daily news and updates.

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You may reply to this email by contacting bcc@dca.ca.gov

 

Happy trails, until next time!

Marie

Medical vs. Adult use Cannabis Products

This is for the benefit of those attempting to understand (including myself) the differences of cannabis deemed for medicinal use as opposed to adult use aka recreational use of cannabis and how best to make it available to consumers.

  • What's the difference between medicinal and adult use cannabis?
  • How will it be licensed for retail?
  • How will it be tax exempt for State ID issued card carriers?

In essence, there is physiologically no difference between a Type M-licensed medicinal cannabis plant and a type A-licensed cannabis plant destined for adult use. In addition, the standards of quality will be the same for both license types as per California Dept of Public Health. The only difference between an “A-license” and an “M-license” is how the consumer could be exempt from paying sales tax if used as a prescribed medicine for treatment of a specific ailment and holds a State issued ID card.

Definitions:
“A-license” means a state license issued under this division for cannabis or cannabis products that are intended for adults who are 21 years of age and older and who do not possess a physician’s recommendation.

“M-license” means a state license issued under this division for commercial cannabis activity involving medicinal cannabis.

“Retailer,” for the retail sale and delivery of cannabis or cannabis products to customers. A retailer shall have a licensed premises which is a physical location from which commercial cannabis activities are conducted. A retailer’s premises may be closed to the public. A retailer may conduct sales exclusively by delivery.

“Microbusiness,” for the cultivation of cannabis on an area less than 10,000 square feet and to act as a licensed distributor, Level 1 manufacturer, and retailer under this division, provided such licensee can demonstrate compliance with all requirements imposed by this division on licensed cultivators, distributors, Level 1 manufacturers, and retailers to the extent the licensee engages in such activities. Microbusiness licenses that authorize cultivation of cannabis shall include the license conditions described in subdivision (b) of Section 26060.1.

Tax exemptions:
“The sales and use taxes imposed by Part 1 (commencing with Section 6001) shall not apply to retail sales of medicinal cannabis, medicinal cannabis concentrate, edible medicinal cannabis products, or topical cannabis as those terms are defined in Division 10 (commencing with Section 26000) of the Business and Professions Code when a qualified patient or primary caregiver for a qualified patient provides his or her card issued under Section 11362.71 of the Health and Safety Code and a valid government-issued identification card.”

  • Is it feasible for a dispensary to operate as medicinal only and not offer adult use licensed products?

The short answer is no.

Tax exempt people. Let’s consider a few more complicated issues concerning “M Licensed” cannabis. The consumer is only exempt from paying taxes if they are a STATE card issued patient. This is very different from a physician's recommendation that is widely used to gain membership in today’s collective. Please see HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE - HSC for the requirements for patient & caregiver tax exempt status.

So in comparison to what collectives accept now as a “medical recommendation”, this state issued identification card isn’t something I see a majority of dispensary visiting consumers applying for, in my opinion. The question I’d ask now is, of those that have a current “medical recommendation”, how many will actually go to the state and apply for the tax exemption status vs. how many will just opt to pay taxes for either type A or M licensed products? From what I can understand a consumer can purchase both A or M licensed products. Only the State ID card carriers would be exempt from paying tax on M licensed products only. So it’s not a matter of the Medicinal or Adult Use of the products, it’s just whether or not sales tax is collected.

I would estimate that a larger percentage of those who currently have current “medical recommendations” to gain access to a collective currently would opt to not renew those recommendations and purchase type A or M licensed product and happily pay the taxes, (motivation to keep them low). Because they are essentially the same products.

Considering that From 2004 through January of this year, 85,370 medical marijuana identification cards have been issued by California counties, an average of 7,100 cards per year, wouldn’t that would severely limit the opportunity for profitable business if a dispensary were limited to selling only type “M-Licensed” products to only State ID holders? And would it cause consumers to unnecessarily obtain a medical ID card to be able to purchase a product such as a pain relieving topical.

I often hear elected officials contemplate medicinal only dispensaries because “we’re just not comfortable with adult use yet”. I ask you to consider this truth; A large part of the SLO County population is comfortable with it. They are experienced, educated, ready and eager to purchase the products they voted for access to. Aside from prohibition of adult use complicating product sales for such things as topicals it would seem that by allowing for a combined A & M licensed dispensary or retail store-front would result in:

Providing the consumers what they asked for.
Lessen the propensity for black market sales.
Keep revenue in your locality instead of giving it all to Grover Beach or outside delivery services.
Save time in the future from having to go back and change ordinances.
Greater chance of profitability for the dispensary by being able to offer a wider range of products for consumers.

These matters are extremely complicated especially if one is unfamiliar with the how’s, who’s and why’s of cannabis activities. So without seeming to minimize the complexity and implications of cannabis business in our communities, I’d argue that by allowing a dispensary that sells both type A & M licensed products the process would be less complicated in the long run, better suited for local consumers and profitable for the store owner.

San Luis Obispo County Cannabis Business Association is a local non-profit agency offering assistance in understanding state law and how it applies to SLO County and it’s residents. We strive to bridge the gaps of understanding by working with stakeholders and community leaders to compile timely and accurate information needed to implement conscientious regulations that will serve our communities without compromising their integrity.

Please feel free to use us as a resource by reaching out to any of our SLOCCBA Board Members, or myself.

Kindly,
Marie Roth
SLOCCBA President
(805) 712-5963

P.S.

AB133 is now positioned to replace SB94. Other notable language in the trailer bill AB133:

By using the “Ctrl F” key please search “requirements” to learn more about licensing requirements.

MAUCRSA requires that a licensed medicinal cannabis manufacturer only manufacture cannabis products for sale by a medicinal cannabis retailer. AB133 would repeal those provisions making it possible for one manufacturer to produce for both medicinal as well as adult use products. These products can also be sold in the same store right next to each other on the same shelf.

“The Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), among other things, consolidates the licensure and regulation of commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis activities.”

Blending Cannabis Culture with Professional Services

One of the most interesting things I've observed since entering into the "Cannabis Space" is the opportunity for ancillary professional business services.  With a handle on the lingo and a healthy budget for the calendar of events one could easily penetrate the warm market of the emerging California Cannabis Industry.

How could professional business services impact the cannabis industry?

  • Maturity & sophistication of the cannabis culture & businesses
  • Solutions to banking, investment & business barriers
  • Well funded innovation & business venture

Resulting in:

  • Lagging regulation struggling to keep up with inventive business ventures and consumer trends
  • Frustrated law enforcement
  • Bewildered & frightened community leaders
  • Continued prosecution, fines, attorneys & destroyed livelihoods.

Maturity of the cannabis industry has been happening at a rapid pace.  The sophistication is meeting both the demand and consumer expectations; investors are flocking, business is already booming!  It won't be long before banks are open to do business with the industry, soon to be happily enjoying the fruits of profitable business investments.

Unfortunately, what I've seen so far is the industry is by far out pacing regulation, and has been for about 20 years now.  With the adoption of new laws and ordinances there's sure to be misunderstandings and mistakes interpreting said laws and ordinances, resulting in disruption in the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness of American people.

Our community leaders, naturally are conditioned to seek approval from constituents as they struggle to set guidelines for an industry they still understand little about.

Law Enforcement will now have something solid to hold industry participants to.  The line between civil and criminal will continue to be interpreted, let's just hope without too many trials and tribulations.

We're just getting into the thick of things, don't crap out yet!

Stay tuned!

Marie

SLOCCBA Pres

 

 

Sold out Wine & Weed Event in Santa Rosa, CA

Wine & Weed Symposium, a brief overview.

August 5, Santa Rosa, CA,

Last week I had the pleasure of attending the Wine Industry Network's Wine & Weed Symposium in Santa Rosa Ca.  I'd been looking forward to it for weeks as the event had sold out about a month prior. Two of my favorite things coming together in one event? Surely, I must be dreaming! I couldn't help but to anticipate with excitement what could come of such a gathering.

Off we set from Paso Robles wine country in the wee morning hours of August 5th, headed North to Santa Rosa.  We were scheduled to arrive by 8am at the Hyatt Vineyard Creek, where the symposium was to take place. I dragged along a couple of event coordinator associates of mine to gain their perspectives on how all this may play out when it comes to meeting the demands of consumers concerning parties, events, cannabis consumption and party favors. None of us had a clue as to what kind of experience awaited us.

The Program:

We walked into a bustling environment thick with anticipation to get this program started! The layout flowed down a great foyer into an adjacent banquet room lined with exhibitors as well as a constantly updated (throughout the day) variety of refreshments and canapé items. (non medicated, just in case you wondered).  The time finally arrived for us to be seated among the sold out crowd of 450 attendees to hear opening comments by Senator Mike McGuire and Wine Industry Network President, George Christie.

The vast array of speakers line up at the Wine & Weed Symposium consisted mostly of seasoned cannabis entrepreneurs and advocates with one winemaker in the mix who happens to sit on the Mendocino Cannabis Industry Association representing both wine and cannabis. Senator Mike McGuire started off with opening remarks, a little bit of history as to how we all ended up in that room together, encouraging both industries to collaborate seeking to find innovative solutions for all of California's Ag crops to be profitable and sustainable.

Hezekiah Allen, CGA and Aaron Smith, NCIA started off the discussions with the hard realities facing the cannabis industry.  7 in 10 canna-businesses will not make the cut.  Cannabis production in California is out of control producing 8 times more than in previous history.  The quality is questionable. The Feds and banking continue to be a problem.  Listening between the lines, the painful truth of industry take over by those investors looking to "make millions" did not escape me, nor did the frustration of legacy growers due to this intrusion.  How does it seem fair that growers, producers and providers who've sacrificed EVERYTHING for the past 20 or so years do all this work so that business men in suits can move on in with money and resources, growing Walmart weed?  How could that possibly have a place in the California Cannabis industry?  Ahhhh, something our California wine industry knows all too well.  The wine industry can offer some lessons to those legacy cannabis growers.  You're in for a big long fight to hold on to what you've created. It's not impossible, just takes hard work, partnerships in resources, passion and determination. Another parallel.

Stats:

I'm somewhat of an optimist, and I've had experience bringing adverse groups together in one room, always anxious to spot & nurture the spark of collaboration, and this group was no different.  It's been no secret that the wine industry has been looking at this new crop of cannabis with wary speculation.  Wary of competition, not only of consumers but in resources needed to produce these commodities, water and workers being the two most prevalent issues facing farmers today.

Organizers of the event used a fantastic audience interaction tool called Sli.do to capture polls and questions from the audience. It was interesting to see which industry the attendees were representing as well as the attitude they had brought with them to this symposium, collaborative or competitive?  As you can see by my screenshot here, the results were overwhelmingly collaborative with a majority of the wine industry deepening their understanding of how these two crops cross over in many ways.  The event was attended by primarily wine industry folks, with only 7% considering cannabis to be a competitor in their market place.

The big question:

Are grapes and weed compatible crop mates? That would only depend on if your idea of organic is all natural microbial sustainability using no "certified" organic products anywhere on your farm.  Cannabis testing requirements will require acceptable contaminant levels be in the parts per billion, standards of which very few grape growers could adhere to, let alone any commercial farmer growing anything in California. Except, that is, for the legacy grower who's been doing this for a while, adhering to Mother Natures organic ways.  In addition the state has set some pretty hard lines between cannabis and wine production & consumption in the same locations.

 

Exhibitors:

In addition to several hours of riveting speaker content there were dozens of vendors lining the hallways and filling up another entire banquet room. What really impressed me most was the sophistication of products and who those products were being consumed by! Would you believe professional business women & mothers over the age of 40?   Companies like HerbaBuena and Garden Society have nailed this market with beautifully designed packaging and micro dosages that make sense for the functional adult.

Garden Society's Bright Blooms
HerbaBuena

Then there's CannaCraft.   Remember how I mentioned larger companies with the money and resources?  Well this is what they look like and I gotta tell you, it's impressive. We did get to tour their facility in Santa Rosa, I'll admit to strong feelings of envy for SLO County who I don't think has the capacity quite yet to appreciate something like their amazing "tasting room & lounge".  Don't get me wrong here, I do believe there is a place for large scale, consistent, cannabis production, but I don't think it should squeeze out traditionally grown flower, in fact I believe embracing the traditional outdoor grower would be a positive addition to any product line up.  Read a bit about CannaCrafts adventures in compliance. 

Overall, the Wine and Weed Symposium resonated with most that there is not only room for collaboration, but it just might be downright necessary in order for the boutique farmer (of any produce) to survive in California.  The State of California has made provision for cannabis cooperative farming and production, who's to say we can't collaborate/cooperate with other crop producers?  Coupled with a constant flow of thoughtful & creative product development presented with brilliant branding and marketing techniques, the possibilities are endless.  Co-farming, co-marketing and co-consumption.  Sounds like an idea worth considering.

Many thanks to the Wine Industry Network for putting on this event, it was spectacular!  I loved the interaction and the many people I met.  I look forward to Wine & Weed on the Central Coast in 2018!

Cheers & 'ere,

Marie Roth, President, SLO County Cannabis Business Association

The Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact

Good day!

I wanted to share with you and impact study that was done by The Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area of Colorado and released in September of 2016.   This information came my way recently byway of local law enforcement.  During my conversation with the officer I found my self sympathizing with the plight of the peace officer in their daily struggles to maintain peace and order especially when it comes to outsiders coming to the Central Coast for some R n R.

I'm going to be the first to point out that this contradicts what the Healthy Kids Colorado Survey of 2015 indicates about use among the youth. Nonetheless in order to be as balanced as Fox News, we report, you decide.

It is, however, critical to note that policy makers get most of their insight from local law enforcement.  What well behaved board of supervisors or city council would go against the advice of local law enforcement?

Enjoy "The Legalization of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact" during your next reading session.

If you wish to discuss this topic as well as others please consider joining us at F. McLintocks this Thursday at 5PM for a "Meet and Mingle" event in the saloon.

 

Canna Luis Obispo County Be Shining Example of Local Cannabis Collaboration?

SLO Board of Supervisors punt the

County Cannabis Ordinance back to the Planning Commission for further detail.

Tuesday's meeting at the San Luis Obispo Board of Supervisors was positive in the way that county staff  and the Board of Supervisors' education in the ways of cannabis is coming along nicely, but it's still back to the drawing board for the Planning Commission. Watch the archive here. (Its last on the agenda, maybe around the 2:00pm mark.)

Set backs and "limits" were the topic of most comments from the public.  Let the market be the dictator of "limiting" the license types, to put it simply. Even Lynn Compton was in defense of "Her Nurseries" in Nipomo. And now that she knows what a delivery only dispensary is, things are looking up for that segment of the industry as well. (I have to tell you that there was talk of a company outfitting ice-cream trucks as mobile dispensaries, I kid you not.  As wonderful of an idea as that sounds, it wasn't going to fly in SLO County. )

So, staff was sent back to get familiar with how the Governors Budget Trailer Bill will effect the whole process; come up with a defensible limit or cap on cultivation licenses if they can;  take another look at how that 300 ft set back for outdoor and if that's a defensible distance; Define indoor, outdoor and mixed light; Map out out a process in which applications would be received and prioritized among other things due to present themselves along the way.  The process continues.....

During this process, the Planning Commission is where you'd want to send your specifics to if you're wanting to hone in requirements for a specific license type. I would imagine there to be more workshops through the planning commission, I'll check on those dates and make sure their posted on the SLOCCBA.org calendar.

They'll be bringing the ordinance back to the board sometime in August. I think they'll be pretty close to the mark by then, we could be looking at meeting the urgency ordinance deadline of September 18th.  There is still one more extension to the ordinance available if needed. There was also talk of extending it for the Coastal Zone while the Coastal Commission deliberates later this summer, if I remember correctly.

What about taxes you ask?  July 25th is when the tax discussion will come in front of the board of sups. Since we have a majority of conservative supervisors we can anticipate the taxes being reasonable and in line with other Ag. John Peschong said on Tuesday that he's not interested in the county making any money off of this industry, just to recoup costs of what it takes to process and manage. It will be important to be involved in that process as the cities will be making their own decisions.   There is one thing the tourist industry would like to see is consistent taxation, rules for retail and available consumption areas (If any) throughout the county unincorporated areas and cities.   This will still require alot of continued input by alot of people representing several perspectives.

Eat your Wheaties folks, we still have alot of work to do!

That's it, in the smallest coconut shell I could find for today!
Good day!

SLO Cannabis Ordinance Questions to Stakeholders!

 

San Luis Obispo County Cannabis Ordinance Public Comment - Draft #3

SLO County is asking for more input.

Yet again our county representatives are reaching out to the stakeholders for input as they carefully consider commercial cannabis activity in San Luis Obispo County.
Originally the focus had been on medical cannabis activity, however, due to the passing of Prop 64 combined with the Governor's proposal to mesh the two license types, you'll notice some questions pertaining to adult use commercial cannabis activity as well.
Click on the images below to link with the full slide show presentation.

Please follow the link to the SLO County Board of Supervisors agenda documents pertaining to commercial cannabis activity in SLO County unincorporated areas. Agenda, documents, & SLO Planning Cannabis site.

Be at the hearing meeting, Tuesday, June 20th at 1055 Monterey St. SLO County Board of Supervisors.  this item is #48, expected to be up after the 1:30PM lunch break.

See ya there!

Waiting with anticipation the Draft #3 SLO County Cannabis Ordinance…..

SLO County slow to release Draft #3 Ordinance 1 week before public comment. 

SLO County Admin has decided to not release the next draft ahead of it being posted with the BOS agenda. It will be attached to the agenda due for release either Tuesday or Wednesday of this week, is the word from the SLO Planning Dept.

Keep tabs on the SLO County Website checking the agenda often in the next few days to be one of the first to read this much anticipated third draft to the SLO County Cannabis Ordinance.
Main contention points to the #2 Draft are:
22.40.020 C. producers of edible products cannot extract at home.  How many of you use a Magic Butter Machine or a crock pot to extract?
22.40.040 C. 3. Nipomo Mesa Area - Separation of sites by 1000ft from property lines. Can there be mfg, testing or processing within that 1000 ft? It seems that limitation would be in contrast to a "campus" style production facility model.  Why?
Click here In case you need to refer to the entire Title 22 Land use Ordinance of SLO County.
F. 1. Water - Does anyone realize all cultivators need to be registered with the California Water Resources?
G. 4. Cultivation is not allowed on previously undisturbed land in SLO County.  Won't that hamper the ability to expand or start a new outdoor grow?  Again, why?
Ooooh, if you've had a previous code enforcement violation # G. 5. might hurt a little.

Then there's the 22.90.030 where all cannabis activities in the Carrizo Planning Area are prohibited.....apparently that includes all Ag land as well.

Let's now hop over to the Coastal Zone, shall we?  Take into consideration where you'll be able to operate your non-storefront mobile dispensary or cultivation site.

This is just touching on a few of the issues. What we need is more input as to how these proposed regulations will effect your future business plans.  Get the conversation going!

Until Next time!

Marie

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