February SLOCCBA Meet & Mingle & The Carlton Hotel

San Luis Obispo County Cannabis Business Association

“Cultivating relationships, ideas and solutions for the SLO County cannabis businesses.”

Join SLOCCBA for the February 22nd Meet & Mingle at The Carlton Hotel in Atascadero, CA

Doors open at 5:15-

5:30 - the program begins so get there early for a good seat!

Regulatory updates- Jamie Jones, Kirk Consulting, Land Use Consultant8830 Morro Rd., Atascadero, CA 93422, 805.461.5765

Compliance Updates - Cannabis Meister, Bud and Kari Taro.Know the rules of consumption!

Featured Speaker - Dr. Kirk Azevedo. "From Monsanto to Marijuana; A Personal Perspective. Dr. Kirk examines how toxins can be consumed through the food be buy as well as grow in your own backyard.

6:30PM- Mix - Who’s who and who and what do they do? Each Attendee will have an opportunity to introduce themselves to the audience. Please be prepared to state your name, business, what you services or products you have to offer, or your request for products or services. Bring your business cards or contact information. Contact the organizer to arrange a specific connection you'd like to make.

7:00PM- Mingle aka, Networking. It is our goal that by this time you have a pretty good idea of who you want to connect with. Go get em!

Enjoy refreshments and appetizers by Charmed Catering!

SLOCCBA Feb Meet & Mingle

Paso Robles Planning Commission – Rezoning

Paso Robles Planning Commission hearing, Tuesday February 13th 6PM, City Council Chambers

Rezone 18-001 - Medical Cannabis Delivery Services Ordinance
Recommendation to City Council.
Options:
1. Recommend to the City Council approval of Ordinance No. XXX
(Attachment 1) to require approval of a TUP, effective for up to oneyear,
to permit establishment of non-storefront, medical cannabis
delivery services to local residents, to permit existing businesses to be in
compliance with State licensing requirements.
2. Recommend to the City Council approval of Ordinance No. XXX
(Attachment 1), with modifications suggested to the ordinance.
3. Continue this item and provide direction to staff for additional analysis.
4. Recommend denial of the proposed ordinance, with specific Findings for
denial from the Planning Commission.

March 22nd SLOCCBA March Meet & Mingle

San Luis Obispo County Cannabis Business Association,  “Cultivating relationships, ideas and solutions for SLO County cannabis businesses."

Join SLOCCBA for the March 22nd Meet & Mingle at The Firefly Haven, Arroyo Grande, CA                                                          **Limited to 30 attendees only!** 

5:30 - Doors open for mingling.

6:PM -Regulatory, Legislative & Compliance Updates, Know the "Rules of Consumption" in SLO County and cities. 

**Exclusive reveal from a local vertically integrated cannabis business, be the first to see the topical product line up! Stay tuned for more details.

6:30PM- Mix - Who’s who and who and what do they do?  Each Attendee will have an opportunity to introduce themselves. Please be prepared to state your name, business, what you services or products you have to offer, or your request for products or services.  Bring your business cards or contact information.  Contact the organizer to arrange a specific connection you'd like to make.

7:00PM- Mingle aka, Networking.  It is our goal that by this time you have a pretty good idea of who you want to connect with. Go get em!

Enjoy refreshments and appetizers brought to you by Natures Kitchen in Templeton!

March 22 Mix and Mingle SLOCCBA

General admission to the event is $100.

Future events dates are:

April 26th - TBA

May 10th - Wine & Weed Symposium at Embassy Suites

June - SLO Arts Museum

Thank you to the many business professionals bringing valuable information to cannabis business owners & consumers, and those who plan to be seeking any type of license approval, both locally and at the state level.

Interested in membership?  Please call (805) 391-4970 and speak with Marie regarding the many different ways to become involved and support our mission to provide quality, locally grown cannabis products to the regulated marketplace.

If you are a:

  • Professional business service
  • Cannabis Industry Stakeholder
  • Consumer

SLOCCBA Membership provides you:

  • Professional Business Referrals
  • Local Government & Agency Liaison
  • Community & Consumer Education
  • Access to events and latest industry developments
  • Discounts with affiliate members

Another Cannabis Trade Association in SLO County? Why?

Greetings and Happy New Year!

I can't tell you how happy I am to be on the other side of 2017.   I know its psychological, but January 1st, just seems like a new, fresh start is making it's self available.  As I look forward to the future of SLO County Cannabis Business Association and it's impact here in San Luis Obispo County, I cannot help but to take a quick look back, just so we can better identify how to move forward.

December 19th several dozen cannabis industry operators were compelled to gather at SLO Brew, The Rock in San Luis.  I decided to sit that one out when I learned the purpose was to form a trade association for San Luis Obispo Cannabis businesses.  Hello!? SLOCCBA is already a cannabis trade association in SLO County, how many does this little county need?  I was puzzled as to why one would want to create yet another trade association in SLO County when the industry partners are supposed to be uniting, not dividing at this time.  It was my hope that now with solid regulation to sink our teeth into and we've put this referendum drama behind us, the several different factions here in the county could finally come together.  Another attempt at a trade association, I think, will be confusing.  Let's see what we can do to unify.
Before we get to that, I'm going to tell you what I've observed as I sit on the side of the local industry looking in.  It seems to me that some of the major players who are "local" have all done business with one another at some point, and have screwed or have been screwed by someone along the way.  It also would seem that some of the operators have unsavory pasts.  Most legacy operators that I have spoke with have very little if any positive things to say about other operators. This has been the single most difficult thing to get past, in my opinion.  This behavior makes the local industry operators look very unprofessional and unsophisticated in best business practices.  Note that I say "some", not all fall into this category, nevertheless, they've been reluctant to associate with unsavory characters, exacerbating the difficulty with unification.
I've lived in this county for almost 40 years, in the conservative North County, mind you.  In the past year, as I've tried to build this association and made affiliations along the way, it's mind boggling how many times I've been "warned" about who I should be cautious of because of past this or that.  It's absurd and it's crippling our local efforts!  As frustrating as John Peschongs "Slow" approach has been to roll out regs, I find I've been just as cautious in building the foundation of SLO County's cannabis trade association.  But at what point do we come together, accept each other, opinions, talents, past flaws and all, instead of starting another faction every time someones unhappy with members or the Association?
When I got into this, all I wanted to do was to help businesses connect with the professional business services they will need to be successful. I saw a need to bring this local cannabis community together. I was also hoping I'd be able to connect better with elected officials in my neck of the woods.  This has all proved a little more difficult than I had imagined.  Bottom line:
Local cannabis businesses must compromise with each other first before they can expect any compromises from elected leadership. 
SLOCCBA is having a board meeting, Monday, January 15th, 4PM. Location is 3524 El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA.  We do have a few board seats to fill and will be opening up membership, something we've been working on for the past year.  I'd encourage you all to attend and consider how you can help pull folks together and begin to work as one representation.  We're asking for those who are interested in a position on the board to submit a resume and/or bio including what expertise and experience they would be lending to the organization.
Let's start this new year off on a positive note with a fresh, clean slate.  I'd love for you to come to the meeting and let's get this thing moving in a coordinated fashion.
In kindness,
Marie Roth

SLO County Licensing workshop

Know Before You Grow- Application Workshop on December 11, 2017

Author: Department of Planning & Building
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 2:01 PM

Do you have questions about the recently adopted regulations for cannabis activities in the unincorporated areas of San Luis Obispo County? Read on for more information regarding the permanent ordinances and application process.


The Board of Supervisors adopted regulations for cannabis activities in SLO County on November 27, 2017.

Are you an applicant seeking to apply for a land use permit?

The Department of Planning and Building will be holding an application workshop on December 11, 2017. The workshop will be held from 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. in Room 161/162 (next to the Board of Supervisors’ Chambers). No applications will be accepted at this workshop; instead, staff will be on hand to answer questions regarding the application process and to provide general property information and information on the cannabis ordinances.

If you would like to look up specific property information from home, please use our PermitView program.

No inland land use applications will be accepted until the inland ordinance is effective (December 31, 2017). No coastal land use applications will be accepted until the coastal zone ordinance is certified.

What activities require a land use permit?

All activities, except for personal and caregiver cultivation, require a County land use permit to operate, in addition to a County business license and a State cannabis license.

Where can you find more information on the adopted ordinances?

Where can you find more information on the application process?

What do you need to do after a land use permit is approved?

What about taxation?

California Allows Cannabis Monopolies

In the past almost two years that I've been working in the California cannabis space, I've been inspired by the American dream of owning one's own business.  The opportunity that's come about for Californians to transition to a legitimate, above board cannabis business has been met with unprecedented enthusiasm by thousands of currently operating small canna-biz owners.

This is precisely why I got into this gig, I could see the potential for these businesses to provide locally grown, quality products to those in need in their community and even enjoy a little California Cannabis market competition much like our California wine industry does.  I instantly wanted to be a part of this historic transition to help guide these business owners by gathering & sharing the resources I've acquired to help businesses become competitive & successful in the modern marketplace.

While these small businesses have been busy positioning their seat at the table so have inventors,  investors and large corporations.  Unfortunately, the State of California Regulators made a decision yesterday in the release of  final state commercial cannabis production regulations to not limit cultivation to 1 acre.  This is a devastating decision and does little in protecting the original California cannabis growers way of farming.  Say hello to big corporate and mechanized cannabis farming in California.  Say good by to your small scale local cannabis provider as the vicious competition begins to provide cheap mass produced California cannabis products to the undiscriminating consumer.  Ultimately lowering the price of cannabis making it financially impossible for the small farmer to afford to participate.

Can we demand a fair market place for the original cannabis producer?   Can we salvage the legacy of California sungrown cannabis cultivated by the loving hands of experienced and compassionate farmers?

Yes we can!  Start by completing this survey TODAY from California Growers Association. asking for a cap of 1 acre cultivation. http://www.calgrowersassociation.org/1_acre. 

And then be sure to contact your local state representative to let them know how you feel about large corporate monopolies taking over California cannabis production.

Corporate cannabis cultivation is contradictory to California Cannabis Cultivation! 

Contact - Assemblymen Jordan Cunningham

Contact - Senator Bill Monning

Until next time~

Peace

Marie

 

 

New Cannabis Taxes Begin January 1, 2018

As we near the GO date of January 2nd, 2018 there are many facets of doing canna-biz that will all have to pull together in somekind of organized fashion.  One of those aspects is taxation.  Instead of writing a summary of the e-mail I received this morning from The Bureau, I'll share it with you in it's entirety.

 

October 3, 2017-

If you sell cannabis or cannabis products, you must register with the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) for a seller’s permit. Cannabis cultivators, processors, manufacturers, retailers, microbusinesses, and distributors making sales are required to obtain and maintain a seller’s permit as a prerequisite for applying for a license with the California Department of Food and Agriculture, the California Department of Consumer Affairs, or the California Department of Public Health.

Distributors of cannabis and cannabis products must also register with the CDTFA for a cannabis tax permit to report and pay the two new cannabis taxes to the CDTFA. The cannabis tax permit is in addition to your seller’s permit.

Beginning January 1, 2018, two new cannabis taxes are in effect:
• A 15 percent excise tax is imposed upon purchasers of cannabis and cannabis products. Retailers are required to collect the excise tax from the purchaser and pay it to the cannabis distributor.
• A tax on the cultivation of cannabis that enters the commercial market is imposed upon cultivators. Cultivators are required to pay the cultivation tax to either a distributor or a manufacturer depending upon the nature of the transaction. The cultivation tax rates are:

o $9.25 per dry-weight ounce of cannabis flowers, and

o $2.75 per dry-weight ounce of cannabis leaves.

All cannabis businesses making sales are required to:
• Register online with the CDTFA for a seller’s permit.
• File sales and use tax returns electronically and pay any sales and use tax to the CDTFA. Even if none of your sales are subject to sales tax, you are still required to file a return and report your activities on your return to the CDTFA.

In addition, if you are a cannabis distributor, the following requirements apply to you:
• Prior to January 1, 2018, register online with the CDTFA for a cannabis tax permit. (Registration will be available in November 2017.)
• Beginning January 1, 2018, collect the excise tax from retailers you supply.
• Beginning January 1, 2018, collect the cultivation tax from cultivators or manufacturers that send or transfer cannabis and cannabis products to you.
• File both your cannabis tax and sales and use tax returns electronically and pay any tax amounts due to the CDTFA.

For additional information about the Bureau of Cannabis Control, or to subscribe to email alerts to hear about updates as they become available, please visit our website - http://www.bcc.ca.gov/. For information on all three licensing authorities, please visit the state’s cannabis web portal – cannabis.ca.gov. Follow the Bureau on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for daily news and updates.

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You may reply to this email by contacting bcc@dca.ca.gov

 

Happy trails, until next time!

Marie

October 3rd Board of Supervisors Meeting

 

October 3rd Board of Supervisors meeting will be hearing the final recommendations from the SLO County Planning Commission.

9:00am  Board of Supervisors Chambers

1055 Monterey St.

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Medical vs. Adult use Cannabis Products

This is for the benefit of those attempting to understand (including myself) the differences of cannabis deemed for medicinal use as opposed to adult use aka recreational use of cannabis and how best to make it available to consumers.

  • What's the difference between medicinal and adult use cannabis?
  • How will it be licensed for retail?
  • How will it be tax exempt for State ID issued card carriers?

In essence, there is physiologically no difference between a Type M-licensed medicinal cannabis plant and a type A-licensed cannabis plant destined for adult use. In addition, the standards of quality will be the same for both license types as per California Dept of Public Health. The only difference between an “A-license” and an “M-license” is how the consumer could be exempt from paying sales tax if used as a prescribed medicine for treatment of a specific ailment and holds a State issued ID card.

Definitions:
“A-license” means a state license issued under this division for cannabis or cannabis products that are intended for adults who are 21 years of age and older and who do not possess a physician’s recommendation.

“M-license” means a state license issued under this division for commercial cannabis activity involving medicinal cannabis.

“Retailer,” for the retail sale and delivery of cannabis or cannabis products to customers. A retailer shall have a licensed premises which is a physical location from which commercial cannabis activities are conducted. A retailer’s premises may be closed to the public. A retailer may conduct sales exclusively by delivery.

“Microbusiness,” for the cultivation of cannabis on an area less than 10,000 square feet and to act as a licensed distributor, Level 1 manufacturer, and retailer under this division, provided such licensee can demonstrate compliance with all requirements imposed by this division on licensed cultivators, distributors, Level 1 manufacturers, and retailers to the extent the licensee engages in such activities. Microbusiness licenses that authorize cultivation of cannabis shall include the license conditions described in subdivision (b) of Section 26060.1.

Tax exemptions:
“The sales and use taxes imposed by Part 1 (commencing with Section 6001) shall not apply to retail sales of medicinal cannabis, medicinal cannabis concentrate, edible medicinal cannabis products, or topical cannabis as those terms are defined in Division 10 (commencing with Section 26000) of the Business and Professions Code when a qualified patient or primary caregiver for a qualified patient provides his or her card issued under Section 11362.71 of the Health and Safety Code and a valid government-issued identification card.”

  • Is it feasible for a dispensary to operate as medicinal only and not offer adult use licensed products?

The short answer is no.

Tax exempt people. Let’s consider a few more complicated issues concerning “M Licensed” cannabis. The consumer is only exempt from paying taxes if they are a STATE card issued patient. This is very different from a physician's recommendation that is widely used to gain membership in today’s collective. Please see HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE - HSC for the requirements for patient & caregiver tax exempt status.

So in comparison to what collectives accept now as a “medical recommendation”, this state issued identification card isn’t something I see a majority of dispensary visiting consumers applying for, in my opinion. The question I’d ask now is, of those that have a current “medical recommendation”, how many will actually go to the state and apply for the tax exemption status vs. how many will just opt to pay taxes for either type A or M licensed products? From what I can understand a consumer can purchase both A or M licensed products. Only the State ID card carriers would be exempt from paying tax on M licensed products only. So it’s not a matter of the Medicinal or Adult Use of the products, it’s just whether or not sales tax is collected.

I would estimate that a larger percentage of those who currently have current “medical recommendations” to gain access to a collective currently would opt to not renew those recommendations and purchase type A or M licensed product and happily pay the taxes, (motivation to keep them low). Because they are essentially the same products.

Considering that From 2004 through January of this year, 85,370 medical marijuana identification cards have been issued by California counties, an average of 7,100 cards per year, wouldn’t that would severely limit the opportunity for profitable business if a dispensary were limited to selling only type “M-Licensed” products to only State ID holders? And would it cause consumers to unnecessarily obtain a medical ID card to be able to purchase a product such as a pain relieving topical.

I often hear elected officials contemplate medicinal only dispensaries because “we’re just not comfortable with adult use yet”. I ask you to consider this truth; A large part of the SLO County population is comfortable with it. They are experienced, educated, ready and eager to purchase the products they voted for access to. Aside from prohibition of adult use complicating product sales for such things as topicals it would seem that by allowing for a combined A & M licensed dispensary or retail store-front would result in:

Providing the consumers what they asked for.
Lessen the propensity for black market sales.
Keep revenue in your locality instead of giving it all to Grover Beach or outside delivery services.
Save time in the future from having to go back and change ordinances.
Greater chance of profitability for the dispensary by being able to offer a wider range of products for consumers.

These matters are extremely complicated especially if one is unfamiliar with the how’s, who’s and why’s of cannabis activities. So without seeming to minimize the complexity and implications of cannabis business in our communities, I’d argue that by allowing a dispensary that sells both type A & M licensed products the process would be less complicated in the long run, better suited for local consumers and profitable for the store owner.

San Luis Obispo County Cannabis Business Association is a local non-profit agency offering assistance in understanding state law and how it applies to SLO County and it’s residents. We strive to bridge the gaps of understanding by working with stakeholders and community leaders to compile timely and accurate information needed to implement conscientious regulations that will serve our communities without compromising their integrity.

Please feel free to use us as a resource by reaching out to any of our SLOCCBA Board Members, or myself.

Kindly,
Marie Roth
SLOCCBA President
(805) 712-5963

P.S.

AB133 is now positioned to replace SB94. Other notable language in the trailer bill AB133:

By using the “Ctrl F” key please search “requirements” to learn more about licensing requirements.

MAUCRSA requires that a licensed medicinal cannabis manufacturer only manufacture cannabis products for sale by a medicinal cannabis retailer. AB133 would repeal those provisions making it possible for one manufacturer to produce for both medicinal as well as adult use products. These products can also be sold in the same store right next to each other on the same shelf.

“The Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA), among other things, consolidates the licensure and regulation of commercial medicinal and adult-use cannabis activities.”

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